dare-to-dm: One more piece of advice for players who are new to magic characters: Magic Classes are…

dare-to-dm:

One more piece of advice for players who are new to magic characters:

Magic Classes are more complex than other classes.  They just are. If you’re playing a martial character, you’ll be able to use your basic class features without having to look up the rules every time.  But as a spellcaster, you’ll likely have to reference your spell descriptions for a long time.  And even if you play D&D for years, you’ll never be able to memorize all the spells.

If it’s your first time, I recommend a spontaneous casting class like Sorcerer or Oracle or Bard.  Spontaneous casters get to choose a small list of spells.  They can only cast those spells, but as long as they have spell slots left, they can cast any spell from their list.  These classes are easier because having fewer spells mean you become more familiar with them.  It also means you avoid tedious spell preparation.  

Prepared casters are different. A wizard is a good example of a prepared spellcaster; a wizard can learn any number of spells.  The only limit is time and resources (adding spells to your book costs money).  But a wizard can still only cast a limited number of spells per day, and they have to choose their spells ahead of time.  So let’s say a wizard can cast four 3rd level spells per day.  They pick Fireball (twice), Dispel Magic and Tongues.  Those are the only 3rd level spells they can cast that day.  Even if they know a different 3rd level spell (like Fly, for example), they won’t be able to cast it because they didn’t prepare it.

Prepared casters are more work because you have to understand more spells.  You also have to go out of your way to acquire and learn more spells, and every day you have to choose which ones you’ll be able to cast.

So in summation, all casting classes can be fun.  They each have their advantages and drawbacks.  But spontaneous casters are more beginner friendly.